Late13th -14th Century Tibetan Amoghasiddhi

Brass, inset with turquoise and inscribed in Tibetan on the reverse “Om Mani Padme Hum”
ZoomInfo
Late13th -14th Century Tibetan Amoghasiddhi

Brass, inset with turquoise and inscribed in Tibetan on the reverse “Om Mani Padme Hum”
ZoomInfo
Late13th -14th Century Tibetan Amoghasiddhi

Brass, inset with turquoise and inscribed in Tibetan on the reverse “Om Mani Padme Hum”
ZoomInfo
Late13th -14th Century Tibetan Amoghasiddhi

Brass, inset with turquoise and inscribed in Tibetan on the reverse “Om Mani Padme Hum”
ZoomInfo
Late13th -14th Century Tibetan Amoghasiddhi

Brass, inset with turquoise and inscribed in Tibetan on the reverse “Om Mani Padme Hum”
ZoomInfo

Late13th -14th Century Tibetan Amoghasiddhi

Brass, inset with turquoise and inscribed in Tibetan on the reverse “Om Mani Padme Hum”

6buddhist art, himalayan art, tibet, tibetan art, Amoghasiddhi, dhyani Buddha, buddha, art,

arjuna-vallabha:

Breaking the mold of a casting bronze, Nepal

A good quality replica casting of a Yongle Virupa…
ZoomInfo
Camera
Nikon D80
ISO
1250
Aperture
f/5
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
48mm

arjuna-vallabha:

Breaking the mold of a casting bronze, Nepal

A good quality replica casting of a Yongle Virupa…

Source: arjuna-vallabha

6buddhist art, art, nepal, yongle, himalayan art, Chinese art,

latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
ZoomInfo
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
ZoomInfo
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
ZoomInfo
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
ZoomInfo
latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.
Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo
Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.
This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!
Jeff Watt 10-2010
ZoomInfo

latticelight:

Vajravarahi (Tibetan: dor je pag mo): Vajravarahi is one of the most popular and commonly depicted meditational deities of Tantric Buddhism. She is also found in the same Sanskrit literature (Abhidhana Uttaratantra) that describes the deity Chakrasamvara. Vajravarahi is a form of the deity Vajrayogini. The only difference in appearance is that Vajravarahi has a boar’s head attached to her own, either placed on the top of the head or on the right side of the head.

Sanskrit: Vajravarahi Tibetan: Dor je pag mo

Vajravarahi is typically red in colour although there are other forms and traditions where she can appear in any colour. She has one main face and two hands. The boar’s head can be on top of Vajravarahi’s head or on the left side depending on the tradition. The right hand holds aloft a curved knife and the left a skullcup to the heart. In the bend of the left elbow a katvanga staff is held against the left shoulder. Adorned with bone ornaments and a necklace of heads she stands in a dancing posture on a corpse seat.

This Vajravarahi sculpture is surely one of the finest ever created. The face is beautiful although likely re-painted in the recent past. The body proportions and movement are excellent. The ornamentation is precise and detailed, also textually accurate. The elaborate scarf (not part of the textual description) is beautifully excessive with studded semi-precious stones - likely original to the piece - framing the central figure and bringing the entire sculpture to a fullness that is greater than the sum of the parts. Sculptural perfection - art and iconography!

Jeff Watt 10-2010

(via krodhavighnantaka)

Source: himalayanart.org

6Vajravarahi, tibet, tibetan art, himalayan art, art, buddhist art, buddhism,

centuriespast:

Indra, King of the Gods’ Heaven

Artist/maker unknown, Nepalese

Geography:

Made in Nepal, Asia

Period:

Malla Dynasty (1200-1769)

Date:

c. 1200

Medium:

Mercury-gilded copper alloy with spinel rubies, rock crystal, and turquoise

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Source: centuriespast

6Nepalese art, himalayan art, hindu art, buddhist art, newari, nepal, indra, malla,

miscellaneous-art:

warkadang

Statue of Buddha, monastery of Tapa Kalan, Afghanistan, found in 1923. This photograph is from Paris’s Musée Guimet - Musée National des Arts Asiatiques as part of the French Museum Collection. It’s also on the cover of De Kaboul à Samarcande. Les archéologues en Asie Centrale by Svetlana Gorshenina.

Link ; Link ; Link 

(via leradr)

Source: warkadang

6gandhara, afghanistan, buddha, buddhist art, indian art, art,

centuriespast:

Plaque with Lunar Deity, 7th century

Thailand: Si Thep (?), Mon-Dvaravati period, 600-699
Gold repoussé
3-3/4 x 1-7/8 in. (9.5 x 4.8 cm)
Norton Simon Art Foundation

Not related to Mon-Dvaravati at all…Si Thep is more akin to Pre Khmer art of Cambodia proper….

Lovely though…

(via leradr)

Source: centuriespast

6Si Thep, pre khmer, hindu art, buddhist art, south East Asian art, art,

9th-10th Century Pala Buddha

Bihar

Schist
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9th-10th Century Pala Buddha

Bihar

Schist
ZoomInfo
9th-10th Century Pala Buddha

Bihar

Schist
ZoomInfo

9th-10th Century Pala Buddha

Bihar

Schist

6Pala, buddhist art, art, buddha, bangaladesh, india, indian art, buddhism,

Up from the Deep - BKK Post f

Rare and important 1000 year old evidence of Mon Dvaravati trade with South India and possibly the Middle East.

6dvaravati, mon, buddhist art, archaeology, thailand, asean,

warkadang:

AFGHANISTAN. 1995. The National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul.

Following the civil war in 1992, the museum was looted numerous times, and of the estimated 100,000 objects on display, around 70% of the artefacts were stolen, according to Fahim Rahimi, the chief curator of the National Museum of Afghanistan. Rahimi says countries such as England, Switzerland, US, Iran, Norway, Denmark and Germany have returned some looted objects to Afghanistan but he would like to see more items sent back. [x]

Photograph by Steve McCurry.

(via leradr)

Source: warkadang

6buddhist art, gandhara, Indian art, afghsnistan, buddha, taliban, art,

hinducosmos:

Hoysala Ganesha Statue
Title: Views of Mysore, Negatives made Dec.1854; Printed 1855
Photographer: Linnaeus Tripe (1822-1902)
(via Sotheby’s)

(via leradr)

Source: sothebys.com

6Ganesha, ganesh, hindu art, buddhist art, india, Indian art, hoysala,

arjuna-vallabha:

Kurukulla, bronze from Bengal or Bihar

11th-12th Century Pala Kurukulla.

Bronze with copper inlay.

Source: arjuna-vallabha

6buddhist art, hindu art, pala, bangladesh, himalayan art, buddhist, Kurukulla, art,

arjuna-vallabha:

Detail of Lokeswara sculpture from Nepal

14th Century Avalokitesvara. Nepal, Newari.
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Camera
Canon CanoScan LiDE 210
ISO
Aperture
Exposure
Focal Length

arjuna-vallabha:

Detail of Lokeswara sculpture from Nepal

14th Century Avalokitesvara. Nepal, Newari.

Source: arjuna-vallabha

6buddhist art, nepal, himalayan art, art, tibetan art, buddhist,

philamuseum:

Treasures from Korea: Arts and Culture of the Joseon Dynasty, 1392–1910” is closing next week. Don’t miss your chance to see this incredibly rare, 40-foot-tall Buddhist banner that has never before left Korea. It’s an unprecedented installation that is truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Don’t miss its rarity, splendor, and power.

Watch a behind-the-scenes look at the installing of this Korean National Treasure.

Shakyamuni Assembly,” 1653, Korea (Hwaeomsa, Gurye) National Treasure No. 301

Source: philamuseum

6joseon dynasty, Korean art, buddhist art, korea,

melacolindu:

Hong kong

Great pic

Source: melacolindu

6hong kong, neon, image, art, city,

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